jump to navigation

Looking for an Executive Business Coach? October 17, 2010

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

From time to time, we will present thoughts and ideas from the world of Family and Business Coaching that helps to stimulate personal action that supports your business goals.

In this article, Declan Maguire, Vistage Chair, explains how executive coaching can improve job performance, hone leadership skills and enhance your bottom line
Declan Maguire | Wed Jul 28, 2010
Most of you would answer this question with a resounding no, and understandably so. You either believe coaching is only for “problem people” who need to be “fixed,” or you have never given it much thought because you already consider yourself an effective leader. If you fall into either of these categories, that’s OK. I’m writing this short article especially for you. So let’s explore who retains an executive coach and why, and look at three dynamics of the executive coaching experience you may find surprising.
Who Hires An Executive Coach?
Most executives who retain coaches are not flawed leaders. In fact, quite the opposite is true. The vast majority of people who seek out executive coaches are effective, successful people who want to raise their game. Many of these executives are accomplished CEOs who as leaders of their organizations often find it difficult to get counsel that can help them improve their overall effectiveness. Sometimes they want to continue to achieve successful results, but without having to work 70 or 80 hours per week! Jim Collins might characterize these CEOs as leaders who want to make the transition from “good to great.”
How Can An Executive Coach Help?
Executive coaches assist leaders in many ways, but if I had to identify three broad categories, they would be:
1. To identify and fine-tune their personal leadership and organizational goals.
2. To prioritize and develop action plans to achieve their goals.
3. To help implement their action plans successfully.
It can be invaluable to receive an outside perspective not only with regard to setting goals, but also for creating a mechanism of accountability for achieving them. Some leaders are terrific goal setters, but require assistance with planning. Others are skilled planners, but need help implementing their action plans.
Effective implementation is a common area of focus both from a personal and an organizational perspective. On a personal level, consider the New Year’s resolution: Starting January 1st, you pledge to lose weight, quit smoking, etc. But without a disciplined plan, an unwavering commitment to the goal, and help from others to keep you on track, your well intentioned resolution will, more often than not, give way to your habits of the prior year.
Organizationally, how often have we all witnessed the launch of a bold new company initiative, only to have it dissipate within six months? A great plan can quickly become a failed endeavor because, as David Maister says, “You can’t get the benefits of a strategy that you don’t implement, and half measures are unlikely to work.”
Strengths versus Weaknesses
Many people eschew the notion of retaining an executive coach because they loathe the prospect of being placed under a microscope. They have a perception of spending countless hours engaging in excruciating self improvement exercises. Working on “weaknesses only” is what Tom Rath describes as “taking the path of ‘most’ resistance.” While I don’t recommend ignoring your weaknesses entirely, it’s much more productive and enjoyable to improve upon your strengths. When Larry Bird played for the Boston Celtics, he was among the best three-point shooters to ever play in the NBA. Can you imagine his coach KC Jones asking Bird to spend most of his time in practice working on his slam dunking skills? Sounds ridiculous when you think of it in those terms, doesn’t it? It’s no different in business; good coaches help you develop your strengths. It’s not only more effective, but exponentially more fun.
Questions or Answers?
Stephen Covey says, “Seek first to understand, then to be understood.” By asking thoughtful questions and listening to what you really have to say, your coach will become more thoroughly acquainted with who you are and what you want. Coaching isn’t prescriptive. It’s a process of “assisted self discovery” that asks you to really think about your challenges and aspirations as you may have never done before. It’s an invaluable process that yields lifelong dividends, both personally and professionally.
One-to-One and Group Experience.
As a Vistage Chair, I provide one-to-one coaching to our members, but I see the value of that coaching rise significantly when transferred to our peer group setting. Imagine for a moment that you could gain the perspective of others (beyond just your coach); have a trusted circle of people who care about you and who will hold you accountable for what you want to achieve in your life; and who provide a safe environment for you to “test drive” new ways of thinking and working. It inspires an all new level of trust – trust in ourselves, trust in others, and trust in adopting new beliefs.
Think About Retaining An Executive Coach.
Not because you’re broken, but because you’re not. Consider it because you want to raise your game, amplify your strengths, find a better balance, ask better questions of yourself and others, and invite those who care about you, personally and professionally, to join you on your journey from good to great.
Declan Maguire is a Vistage Chair, and a Certified Professional Facilitator and Coach.
In his work Declan is a catalyst for positive change, challenging his members and clients to reach for the higher level of success they want in their business and life.
declan.maguire@vistage.com

The World of Appreciation and Acknowledgement November 1, 2009

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

Imagine a world where Acknowledgment and Appreciation were practiced generously…where they were automatic in our relationships!!! Imagine how each day would go so differently, how the news would be joyous, how politics and business would be transacted with integrity and respect. We would experience a seismic shift in the way we live our realities.

Perhaps you’re thinking “Not possible?” Your cynicism would be natural. However, I believe it IS possible. What’s required is an understanding of what Acknowledgment and Appreciation is (are?), the knowledge of how, where, why, and when to implement it (them?), and then to practice doing it.

Let’s start with the definitions:

Acknowledgment is: “to see someone authentically as who they are, a human worthy of respect and having a valid point of view.”

Appreciation is:” sensing a person’s intrinsic value and having gratitude for the beauty that surrounds you and that is in every person.”

Now that we understand Acknowledgment and Appreciation, you may be better aware of how much you already know and practice them in your life…or not. For instance, most of know in our heads that we appreciate our Moms and Dads or our friends or spouses or our animals. And mostly we know this in our heads and hearts. But how often do we say to the people in our lives how much we appreciate them and what we acknowledge them for?

What stops us? I believe time, what we are taught, and lack of practice. (I think we need a paragraph that addresses or speaks to how we don’t take the time b/c we make everything else more important given that we’ve been taught not to practice this anyway!)

Most have us have been taught that we should be modest and not boast, which often stops us from acknowledging and appreciating people in our lives. We are taught by well meaning parents and many teachers to “be humble” and avoid bringing ostentatious attention to ourselves and others. This practice stops us from truly understanding and recognizing ourselves and others, what we value, and what our personal gifts are for ourselves and the world.

Going a little further, how do our background, upbringing, and education stop us from really hearing appreciation and acknowledgment when it is given to us? Most of us do not know how to receive compliments and we often brush them off by saying ‘oh no not me’ or ‘thanks but I am not really that’ or ‘I just don’t deserve those kind words’.

It’s really easy to see why most of us are not good at what I will call the game of Appreciation and Acknowledgment.

In a future article, we will explore further the nature of Appreciation and Acknowledgment and begin to look at the “how, where, when and why” of using Appreciation and Acknowledgment. Until then…

Tom Horne
Master Appreciator
Acknowledgment Whiz

Reflection – Subconscious Leadership November 1, 2009

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

Before we can reach our full potential as leaders, we must first be leaders to ourselves. We must capitalize on our innate talents and strengths, challenge the habits that hinder our growth, and manage the fears and negative emotions that frequently keep us from realizing our goals.

As you probably know, our minds function in two distinct spaces: conscious and subconscious. Our conscious space houses our critical, analytical thoughts. Our subconscious is the instinctive, impulsive part of the brain – it houses emotions and memories, and even guides the body to perform its vital functions. While we tend to know our conscious minds rather well, we often overlook the power of the subconscious. Unfortunately, when we do, we squander a wellspring of human potential.

Imagine a tiny ant on the back of a massive African elephant. No matter how diligently that ant marches east, if the elephant he sits upon travels in the opposite direction, the ant will end up farther west than his original starting point. Similarly, we will find ourselves receding from our goals if our conscious and subconscious minds are not aligned. What elephant-like aspects of our personalities hold us back from meeting challenges? How do our emotions get in the way of our ability to act and communicate effectively? What does it truly mean to commit to realize a dream?

Good leaders may recognize they indulge elephant-like habits that keep them shy of their goals – but great leaders do something about it. They confront the behaviors and routines that keep their subcon-scious stuck. They work to refashion deep-seated beliefs, attitudes, and truths so that they support conscious efforts. Great leaders conquer hidden fears and make emotional investments in their vision so that they can show others the way to success. Do you?

Thank you to WALKTHETALK.com

The Full Picture Consulting Group Assists Family Businesses to Deal Effectively with Turbulent Economic Cycles October 17, 2008

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed


Tom Horne and Steve Wallman, partners in The Full Picture, work with Family Business owners on many areas of their businesses. In this edition, we will look at how The Full Picture can support effective Family interactions during very stressful periods like the current economic recessionary environment. High risk and change can have a negative impact on Family Business dynamics. We will also look at how to maximize Trust (a previous edition) and Compassion as success elements in these difficult times.

In a previous edition, we discussed how the current dynamics in the Family Business impact trust and values, especially those values and beliefs that are either misunderstood or hidden from view.

Next, we discussed how ordinary market and family change happens on top of weak communication and unclear values, and the negative impact that has on trust within the family team.

Today, severe change is happening in the world’s financial markets and that is impacting the ability of businesses to borrow, write business supply agreements, and even causing the demise of their customers in a wide range of markets. There are thousands of Family Businesses struggling to keep their companies operating successfully, fueled by cash from profits with heavy support from debt borrowed at the bank and that is getting tight to non-existent.

What is the impact of this potentially overwhelming challenge on family business relationships? Just imagine the frayed nerves and fights caused by money problems on personal lives of families. Now, multiply that by a thousand times and it becomes clear that family relationships and the family business dynamic will be under huge pressure. Trust breaks down; frayed nerves cause compassion and communication to be tossed out the window. What was possible to sustain in good economic times becomes impossible currently. Carrying marginal family members, paying better than average even to producers, carrying out expansion plans, is now impossible as companies face the hard facts: supply of cash is drying up and the business is facing survival.

The talk now is: ‘it’s time to let Joe and Janet go because they are just not contributing’; downsizing or failure is imminent. Under these circumstances, family relationships breakdown and effective leadership of the business is dangerously exposed.

The Full Picture works inside of these challenges. We work with the family in the context of their relationships where the above dynamics exist. Family members unwittingly erect barriers to success during high stress times that result in destructive behaviors and actions and interactions among each other and even with customers and employees.

We help the Family Members identify the Business and Personal Issues that prevent organizational goals from being met even during times of economic turbulence. We create a safe space where the family can talk openly and become clear about the real issues that are hidden from their view. We help them maintain effective communication that results in relationships that work now.

A safe space is created that allows family members the opportunity to effectively deal with the business changes brought on by financial and economic turmoil . We allow them to talk about things that now come up and stop them from being effective…things that they were afraid of dealing with and not ready to address at an earlier time. What we facilitate is the Family Members learning to support each other and confront and communicate with each other in healthier ways. We help them to work on old family dynamics that need to be restructured NOW in order to create trust within the family and assure business success and even survival.

Want to know how Steve and Tom and The Full Picture can help your Clients deal with the negative effects of this challenging economic cycle on the business and family?

Please call us for an engaging and confidential conversation:

tom@thefullpicture.biz T: 773-764-7646

steve@thefullpicture.biz T: 773-255-8189

The Full Picture Announces: Family Business Operating Dynamic Focus…Trust October 11, 2007

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

The Full Picture Announces: Family Business Operating Dynamic Focus…Trust

The Full Picture, a consulting business with a focus on Family Businesses, announces a range of services focused on specialized areas that Family Businesses face at different stages of their Operating existence.

Tom Horne and Steve Wallman, partners in The Full Picture, work with Family Business owners on many areas of their businesses. Let’s look at Trust as an essential element that underlies successful family businesses. We will also look at how and where The Full Picture helps to maximize Trust as a success element.

In family businesses, trust flows from what we know about (and have experience with) our family members. We are generally clear that they are honest, and competent, and benevolent. Even if they are not completely competent, we know our family members will work harder to accomplish objectives. We also know that none of our family will ever hurt the company or any of ‘us’. How do we know all this? Well, we grew up with them and we’ve been working with them, and we…trust them.

So, all family businesses work well because each member trusts one another, right? Well, not quite!

What is it about trust that affects the family business negatively? You see, trust is affected by communication, change, and how each family member’s values and personal circumstances change over time.

Communication is more often than not based on assumptions about what ‘we’ think and ‘how we’ve done things’ in the past. ‘Real’ communication is often defined as what we say are the arguments, and even silences, that happen between family members. We all have experienced this type of communication and we know how unsuccessful that is.

Now, let’s talk values. A family often believes “we all have the same values”. We’re from the same family…we must have the same values! As each family member in the business ages, they begin to get how erroneous that assumption may be. Phrases such as “I want more money”, “we are growing too slow”, “Quality costs us too much today…we’ve got to modernize”, “George just isn’t pulling his weight anymore”, “Tim only works 8 hours a day and still gets the same comp as I do and I work 16 hours”, “Helen used to be good at that job, now she is a fish out of water”, “Dad was so creative in the past, now he’s tired but won’t give up the reins” begin to go through our heads and cause resentments and mistrust in a family business. Trust begins to wane, even for those with whom we have had a close relationship.

Next, change happens. “New competitors are entering our market and taking business from us”, “the company is growing and cash flow is a challenge”, we need a new business model and we’ve always relied on our family for solutions yet that isn’t working anymore”, “Dad never lets me run my area without interfering, so I am leaving this business”. Do these sound familiar? Change happens on top of weak communication, and on top of unclear values.

All of this drives a decline in trust within the family.

The Full Picture works inside of these challenges. We work with the family in the context of their relationships where all the above dynamics exist. Family members unwittingly erect barriers to success over time in very subtle ways in the area of trust and are reflected in destructive behaviors, actions and interactions among family members and even extending to customers and employees.

We help the Family Members identify the Business and Personal Issues that prevent organizational goals from being met. We create a safe space where the family can talk openly and become clear about the real issues that are hidden from their view.

The safe space is created by allowing the family members the opportunity to revisit and share experiences that they had in the family that are unresolved. We allow them to talk about things that they were afraid of and not ready to address earlier and didn’t feel safe in the family to bring these issues out. What we facilitate is the Family Members learning to support each other and confront and communicate with each other in healthier ways. We help them to work on old family dynamics that need to be restructured in order to create trust within the family business.

Want to know how Steve and Tom and The Full Picture can help your Company achieve its goals?

tom@thefullpicture.biz T: 773-764-7646

steve@thefullpicture.biz T: 773-255-8189

October 8, 2007

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

Tom & Steve Successfully Present Concepts at Evanston Chamber Networking Breakfast January 26, 2007

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

On January 23rd, Business Coach Tom Horne and Licensed Clinical Social Worker Steve Wallman presented the first phase of The Full Picture Concepts aka The Primary Questions of the ‘Five Ps’.

The Primary Questions phase of the Full Picture process identifies the Issues and Barriers that prevent the achievement of personal and professional goals and objectives.

There were over 35 Chamber Members participating in the interactive portion of the presentation. Identified issues were divided into Business and Personal categories. All participants created a commitment of confidentiality regarding the discussion of issues that supported openness and trust in the group.

14 Business issues and 9 Personal issues were identified and discussed.

The second dynamic phase of The Full Picture process will be presented in a workshop format at the next Networking Breakfast of the Evanston Chamber on February 27, 2007 at 7:45 AM. See the Chambers’ Announcements for location.

Join Steve & Tom as they present this second phase…Probing Questions…Identifying the experiences that have impacted the business and the individuals of the business. There will be immediate take-to-work value in this exercise.

Tom & Steve Will Present at Evanston Chamber of Commerce Network Breakfast January 12, 2007

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

NETWORKING BREAKFAST: Tuesday, January 23, 2007, 7:45 – 9:15 AM, Tommy Nevins Pub, 1450 Sherman Avenue, Evanston, IL

Are you seeing the Full Picture?

Join business coach Tom Horne and Licensed Clinical Social Worker Steve Wallman for a Network Breakfast Seminar that will help you see The Full Picture in your business and professional life. Tom and Steve team up to help you identify and overcome obstacles to your success and they will give you tools you can begin using that morning to clear the path to better sales, better professional relationships, and better Leadership. Don’t miss the first Networking Breakfast of the new year so you can implement your action plan starting today and achieve your goals for 2007!

Cost: $10 for Members; $15 for guests

Please RSVP by email to info@chamber.com

Reach Your Corporate Goals August 7, 2006

Posted by Tom in : Uncategorized , comments closed

The Full Picture works with companies to help management identify personal and organizational barriers to success.

Do you and your Company see the Full Picture?

Business Coach Tom Horne and Licensed Clinical Social Worker Steve Wallman have joined forces to create The Full Picture to help you identify and overcome obstacles to your personal and business success.

Tom and Steve have over 50 years combined experience working with individuals, groups, and businesses to help organizations reach their goals and objectives.

We have created tools that you can begin using TODAY to clear your path to higher and more profitable sales, dynamic professional realtionships within your company and with your customers, employees, and vendors, and create effective leadership within all your teams.